Things You Should Probably Know, Because I Say So
18th century British/Irish dumbasses using fancy f letters in place of the letter s

occono:

Ftop it

Dumbaffef!

austinkleon:

The birchbark doodles of a 15th century boy

One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of “birchbark documents” (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century…

The drawings from Novgorod that we have found appear to all come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the twelfth century or beginning of the thirteenth century in the city of Novgorod. By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.

These are so great and even better with the captions. (“I am a wild beast!”)

(via @pomeranian99 > erikkwakkel)

catherine-white:

Footed Bowl, Predynastic Period, 3750–3550 b.c.EgyptianH. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm), Diam. 6 in. (15.3 cm)
I am teachig trimming today in my wheel class and this is one of my favorite—objects in the Metropolitan Museum’s collection. is a red polished ware bowl with supports shaped like human feet o good variation form what potters usually refert o as feet.

IS THIS WHERE IT ALL BEGAN?

catherine-white:


Footed Bowl, Predynastic Period, 3750–3550 b.c.Egyptian
H. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm), Diam. 6 in. (15.3 cm)

I am teachig trimming today in my wheel class and this is one of my favorite—objects in the Metropolitan Museum’s collection. is a red polished ware bowl with supports shaped like human feet o good variation form what potters usually refert o as feet.

IS THIS WHERE IT ALL BEGAN?

beatonna:

nevver:

Household Hints

voting, it’s important

I for one welcome our new petticoat rulers!

beatonna:

nevver:

Household Hints

voting, it’s important

I for one welcome our new petticoat rulers!

2burgers2fries2dietcokes:

Today is the 43rd Anniversary of Stonewall.
This is a photo of my friend Raymond’s tattoo.  He posted this on facebook with the following caption:
We’re here because you were there.

2burgers2fries2dietcokes:

Today is the 43rd Anniversary of Stonewall.

This is a photo of my friend Raymond’s tattoo.  He posted this on facebook with the following caption:

We’re here because you were there.


What is it about Fallout that I love so much. Maybe part of it is the music and the atmosphere. I mean, Skyrim is great but I could not pry myself away from Fallout 3 or New Vegas for the life of me.

Maybe I need one of these XD

photofeminist:
guavi:

Many of you are familiar with this ritual all through elementary and middle school, where all the students are made to stand up and make this pledge to the U.S. flag every morning.
The first time I went to school in the U.S. was in 5th grade. At first, when it came time to say the Pledge of Allegiance, I would just stand with everyone and say nothing, because at the time I couldn’t speak enough to actually say the words.
Eventually I learned enough English to understand the meaning behind those words. For quite a while, I continued to just stand there and say nothing as my classmates dutifully repeated those words every morning.
The problem was that this was not my country, it was not my flag, and that god is not my god. My personal national identity is a mess at best, but I can say with 100% certainty that the 10-year-old me was not an American in any sense of the word except for the fact that I happened to be there at the time. I was acutely aware of the contradictions between what I believed and what I was supposed to pledge, and was greatly bothered by them.
Every morning, though, the classmates around me would look at me funny, and the teacher would shoot me pointed stares. I was aware of that, and aware of the implied accusations of “Why aren’t you doing what you’re supposed to” behind every glance. Eventually I caved, and parroted the words with everyone else, every morning, just like the way we were instructed to; all the while questioning the disparity between my voice and my mind.

guavi:

Many of you are familiar with this ritual all through elementary and middle school, where all the students are made to stand up and make this pledge to the U.S. flag every morning.

The first time I went to school in the U.S. was in 5th grade. At first, when it came time to say the Pledge of Allegiance, I would just stand with everyone and say nothing, because at the time I couldn’t speak enough to actually say the words.

Eventually I learned enough English to understand the meaning behind those words. For quite a while, I continued to just stand there and say nothing as my classmates dutifully repeated those words every morning.

The problem was that this was not my country, it was not my flag, and that god is not my god. My personal national identity is a mess at best, but I can say with 100% certainty that the 10-year-old me was not an American in any sense of the word except for the fact that I happened to be there at the time. I was acutely aware of the contradictions between what I believed and what I was supposed to pledge, and was greatly bothered by them.

Every morning, though, the classmates around me would look at me funny, and the teacher would shoot me pointed stares. I was aware of that, and aware of the implied accusations of “Why aren’t you doing what you’re supposed to” behind every glance. Eventually I caved, and parroted the words with everyone else, every morning, just like the way we were instructed to; all the while questioning the disparity between my voice and my mind.

I may never sleep again… 1890’s Roullet & Decamps leaping Lion automaton (via The Automata Blog)